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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2021  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 220-225

Feasibility and adaptation of three-dimensional model for surgical planning and training: A pilot study


1 Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Patna, Bihar, India
2 Associate Professor, Department of Surgical Gastroenterology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Patna, Bihar, India
3 Additional Professor, Department of Burns and Plastic surgery, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Patna, Bihar, India
4 Assistant Professor, Department of Orthopaedics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Patna, Bihar, India
5 Professor, Department of Radio-Diagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Patna, Bihar, India
6 Additional Professor, Department of Radio-Diagnosis, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Patna, Bihar, India

Correspondence Address:
Binita Chaudhary
Department of Anatomy, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Phulwari Sharif, Patna, - 801 507, Bihar
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2277-4025.329493

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Background: Three dimensional (3D) printing can produce accurate anatomical model of any part of the body. This study is based on reconstruction of models of the affected body part for preoperative planning and to see its usefulness in training of resident doctors and for patient education. Methodology: Thirty surgically operated patients were retrospectively reviewed and were divided into the conventional planning group (n = 14) and planning with 3D printing group (n = 16). Pathological structures from clinical cases were identified on multidetector computed tomography images and were then transferred to Dicom to print software and saved in a standard format digital imaging and communication in medicine. Segmented regions were combined to create 3D models. Printout of models was taken after being edited by Geomagic free form plus software. Models prepared using 3D printing technology were used to simulate the real surgical operation. The models were used by surgeons for surgical planning and to train their resident doctors. Surgical duration and blood loss were recorded during operation. A questionnaire was provided to the surgeons and residents to assess the utility of 3D models in pre-surgical planning. Results: The mean surgical time in planning with the 3D printing group and conventional planning group was 129.090 ± 36.79 min and 218 ± 94.932 min (P < 0.05). The intraoperative blood loss in planning with 3D printing group and conventional planning group was 130 ± 69.019 ml and (455 ± 44.122 ml) (P < 0.05). Forty subjects completed the survey. Twenty-nine (96.66%) surgeons gave favorable responses (80% found it to be very helpful and 16% helpful) when asked about the utility of these models in the visualization of abnormal pathological anatomy and preoperative planning. Conclusion: Our study suggests that 3D printing technology is useful to aid to surgical planning and provides teaching materials for residents in learning surgery.


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